Paris roubaix sieger

Yozshugor / 30.12.2017

paris roubaix sieger

Alle bisherigen Sieger des Radrennens "Paris - Roubaix" bis zum Jahr Das legendäre Paris-Roubaix, eines der weltweit schönsten Rennen: die Dann die Erlösung im Velodrom von Roubaix, wo der Sieger als Belohnung den. 6. Apr. Das Velorennen über das Kopfsteinpflaster ist berühmter als seine Sieger. Am Sonntag findet es zum Mal statt. Der Klassiker ist zwar nicht. Dritte Französische Republik Claude Chapperon. Dritte Französische Republik Albert Champion. Er war wachsam und an bayern münchen vs bayer leverkusen Schlüsselstellen präsent. Austragung des Klassikers Paris-Roubaix. Denn sie sind auch im Norden Frankreichs selten geworden. Finden Sie gespeicherte Artikel schnell und einfach. Dritte Französische Republik Hippolyte Aucouturier.

roubaix sieger paris -

Deutsches Reich Herbert Sieronski. Auflage des Rennens war aber Degenkolb. Dritte Französische Republik Maurice Ville. Etappe der Tour of Hainan. Ausgabe im Jahr mussten die Fahrer insgesamt 27 Kopfsteinpflaster-Passagen überwinden. Dieser schickte seinen Mitarbeiter Victor Breyer aus, die Strecke zu erkunden. Finden Sie gespeicherte Artikel schnell und einfach. Das letzte Bindeglied zur Tradition, welcher der Radsport seine Grösse verdankt. Dritte Französische Republik Georges Passerieu.

roubaix sieger paris -

Belgien Roger De Vlaeminck. Auch Mehrfachsieger Tom Boonen fehlte verletzt. Der Brite widmet sich zukünftig wieder dem Bahnradsport und will in Rio seine Medaillensammlung aufstocken. Viel Pech seit seinem Sieg Chancen auf seinen zweiten Sieg nach rechnet sich Degenkolb bei der John Degenkolb ist so gut wie nie: Vielen Dank für Ihre Anmeldung. Wir haben es heute geschafft. Noch gibt es Startplätze für die Fahrt auf legendären Strecken. Wir haben extra den Sonntagnachmittag als Couchpotatoes anstatt auf dem Rad verbracht, und es hat sich echt gelohnt! Moldau Republik Andrej Tschmil. Doch trotz herausragender Form sieht sich der Topstar des deutschen Bora-hansgrohe-Teams allzu oft in der Rolle des Einzelkämpfers, arbeiten doch viele Teams im Rennen gegen ihn. Er ist der bisher letzte französische Sieger des Rennens. Kann John Degenkolb dort als zweiter Deutscher gewinnen? Deutsches Reich Herbert Sieronski. Dritte Französische Republik Lucien Pothier. Denn sie sind auch im Norden Frankreichs selten geworden. Die Flüchtlinge hatten sich nach gut 20 Kilometern vom Feld gelöst und zwischenzeitlich einen Vorsprung von über neun Minuten herausgefahren. Belgien Marcel Van Houtte. Im Rennen am 8.

Paris Roubaix Sieger Video

Paris Roubaix 1992

Paris roubaix sieger -

Denn sie sind auch im Norden Frankreichs selten geworden. Die Flüchtlinge hatten sich nach gut 20 Kilometern vom Feld gelöst und zwischenzeitlich einen Vorsprung von über neun Minuten herausgefahren. Roubaix dpa - Kaum hatte sich John Degenkolb nach seinem historischen Triumph von Roubaix und einer kleinen Teamfeier in den Kurzurlaub verabschiedet, warteten schon ganz neue Aufgaben auf den deutschen Klassiker-Star: Er ist der bisher letzte französische Sieger des Rennens. Dritte Französische Republik Gustave Garrigou. Other sections are excluded because the route of the race has moved east. And so from the course esl meisterschaft 2019 moving to the east to use the cobbles that remained there. A memorial to Stablinski stands at one end of the road. When Stybar attacked his companions four kilometres from the velodrome, however, Van Avermaet's ire was obvious as he shut down the move and then forced the Quick-Step man to close down Langeveld's subsequent attack. His casino classic app Fausto gave him a push to get him away. It is a bleak area with just a bar by the crossroads. Retrieved 22 April Double down casino hack ios was a journalist on a motorbike who managed to get up to me. Dritte Französische Republik Hippolyte Aucouturier. And come what may, you wer ist präsident usa covered in coal dust and other muck. Riders have experimented, however.

He wanted his brother to win. I waited a bit and then I attacked and I caught him and the break. Then I went off by myself. I was going to win Paris—Roubaix.

I looked around for where to go and I was directed round the outside wall of the track, to where the team cars had to park. It wasn't like nowadays, when there's television and everything.

Then it was more chaotic and the whole road was blocked. People said I should have known the way into the track.

But how do you know a thing like that at the end of Paris—Roubaix, when you've raced all day over roads like that? A gendarme signalled the way to go and that's the way I went.

It was a journalist on a motorbike who managed to get up to me. He was shouting 'Not that way! And that's the way I went, except that it came out on the other side of the track from the proper entrance.

The bunch came in and Serse won the sprint. But then his brother told Serse to go to the judges to object. But that was below him. Coppi wanted his brother to have a big victory.

He was a great champion, Coppi, but to do what he did, to protest like that to get a victory for his brother, that wasn't dignified for a champion.

That was below him. A champion like that should never have stooped that low. I never spoke to him about it.

The only other times he rode it were in , when he finished fourth, and in , as the defending champion. When he was criticised, he said: The incident made Hinault angry and he raced back to the others and won in Roubaix.

He was not the first star to refuse. The following year only Zabel was there. In he had stayed at home as well. The fact isn't new but the phenomenon is getting worse and is concerning.

The peloton of stayaways has grown to the point where Paris—Roubaix is now only for a tight group of specialists The race contained a rare spectacle where an early morning breakaway group held on until the finish: As if the success of the breakaway wasn't enough, Paris—Roubaix was about to deliver a cruel irony.

When the two entered Roubaix, Wegmüller ran over a plastic bag that flew out in front of him, which became jammed in his derailleur.

Wegmüller was unable to change gears which was crucial for a sprint finish. He got assistance from his team car to remove the bag, but his gears still would not change.

Knowing that a bicycle change would be suicidal to his chances, Wegmüller continued on his damaged bike; Demol continued to draft behind him.

When it came down to the final sprint, Wegmüller could only watch as Demol sprinted past him to take the victory. Laurent Fignon finished third after a late breakaway from the chasing peloton.

I know the rules, yes, but I don't understand why nobody stopped us, and why nothing was said to us in the 10km that followed.

All that just to be told two minutes before going to the podium that we had been disqualified. Cancellara deserved his victory but for me, I will always be in second place even though I have been disqualified.

A doctor attempted to resuscitate him on the spot. He was flown to hospital in Lille by helicopter for treatment.

Theo de Rooij , a Dutchman, had been in a promising position to win the race but had then crashed, losing his chance of winning.

You're riding in mud like this, you're slipping It is based in France but open to members all over the world. It has its roots in the Paris—Roubaix Cyclo-Touriste of By there were 7, participants.

There and at other events on the course, a petition calling for the cobbles to be saved gathered 10, signatures. Its aim was to find enough stretches of cobbled road to preserve the nature of the race.

So many roads had been resurfaced that, as the organiser said, there was a risk that it would become a fast race on smooth roads won by sprinters rather than those who had fought through hell.

Alain Bernard, who succeeded Vallaeys, says: Today, the association looks after the maintenance of these paths of legend, working with local administrations to preserve them.

But alongside that, we also do other things to preserve the value of the race, building up an impressive collection of documents, holding exhibitions, honouring former winners, holding tours of the route.

Not a day to venture outside Backs bent against the gusts, they tirelessly scratch at the ground with primitive tools.

No, these are members of the "Amis de Paris Roubaix", trying to clean off the mud and crusted earth left on the cobbles by farm work.

They are on an important section of Paris—Roubaix and, without their intervention, the greatest of cycling classics, due to be held in only a few days, will not be able to come through And without these cobbled routes, the Paris—Roubaix would disappear, depriving the whole world of one of sport's most intense and gripping events.

This they know, and they'll be back again the two weekends before the race, far from the media and officials who will soon bustle here.

The passion that drives them is much stronger than the bad weather. It has nothing to do with the current storms in the cycling world.

Paris—Roubaix is sometimes compared to the other famous cobbled race, the Tour of Flanders in Belgium. Paris—Roubaix is flatter and has more difficult cobbles while the Tour of Flanders contains a series of hills, many on cobbles, like the Koppenberg or Kapelmuur.

In addition to Paris—Roubaix and the Tour of Flanders, called the cobbled classics , other spring races like Omloop Het Nieuwsblad and Gent—Wevelgem feature extensive cobbles.

There is a choice of three levels: All finishers receive a small cobblestone on a wooden plinth. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Urging, at times, even helping them victory. They ride in the tracks of bygone legends dreaming of distant fame and glory. But glory is not without a price.

These bloodied and battered warriors struggle through the rain, the cold, the mud, on roads better suited to oxen cart than bicycles. But for the victor there is glory, immortality and a place in history amongst the giants of the road.

Since , the greatest bike racers on earth have come to test their very souls in this brutal and beautiful spectacle". This article maintains the misnomer 'Cobblestones' but attempts to clarify the misnomer where relevant.

Les Amis de Paris-Roubaix. Archived from the original on 12 October Archived from the original on 10 April Archived from the original on 14 March Astronomical Society of South Australia.

How to win cycling's hardest one-day races". Retrieved 27 March Archived from the original on 27 August Le Tour de France.

Archived from the original on 19 June La Voix Des Sports. Archived from the original PDF on Retrieved 22 April Daily life in the peloton". Archived from the original on 17 May Archived from the original on 29 September Retrieved 26 July Archived from the original on 14 June En Haute du Pave Les Amis de Paris Roubaix.

Archived from the original on Retrieved 10 April Retrieved from " https: CS1 French-language sources fr All articles with dead external links Articles with dead external links from June Pages using deprecated image syntax Articles with French-language external links Articles with hCards Official website different in Wikidata and Wikipedia Use dmy dates from January Good articles.

Views Read Edit View history. In other projects Wikimedia Commons. This page was last edited on 15 September , at Diese Seite wurde zuletzt am Oktober um Möglicherweise unterliegen die Inhalte jeweils zusätzlichen Bedingungen.

Durch die Nutzung dieser Website erklären Sie sich mit den Nutzungsbedingungen und der Datenschutzrichtlinie einverstanden.

Cysoing — Bourghelles Bourghelles — Wannehain. Belgien Greg Van Avermaet. Das Hauptfeld folgte mit zwölf Sekunden Rückstand.

Vereinigtes Konigreich Ian Stannard. Spanien Juan Antonio Flecha. Im Ziel hatten die drei Fahrer einen Vorsprung von 3: Vereinigte Staaten George Hincapie.

Vereinigtes Konigreich Roger Hammond. Belgien Peter Van Petegem. Er ist der bisher letzte französische Sieger des Rennens.

Das jährige Jubiläum des Rennens. Das berühmte Mapei -Triple: Teamkollegen Museeuw, Bortolami und Tafi gewinnen mit 2: Mapei-Sportdirektor Patrick Lefevere hatte die Reihenfolge festgelegt.

Moldau Republik Andrej Tschmil. Der jährige Duclos-Lassalle gewann mit hauchdünnem Vorsprung von wenigen Zentimetern. Belgien Edwig Van Hooydonck.

Belgien Dirk De Wolf. Niederlande Adrie van der Poel. Belgien Roger De Vlaeminck. Hinault gewann im Weltmeister-Trikot aus einer enorm prominent besetzten sechsköpfigen Spitzengruppe heraus.

Er ist der bis heute letzte Tour de France -Sieger, der auch in Roubaix gewonnen hat. Seine legendäre Abneigung gegenüber der Kopfsteinpflaster-Strecke unterstrich er mit der Aussage nach seinem Sieg: Deutsches Reich Josef Fischer.

Italien Maurice Garin. Dritte Französische Republik Albert Champion. Dritte Französische Republik Paul Bor. Despite showing flashes of his force of old on the Carrefour de l'Arbre, where he was willed on by an expectant public, he was unable to close the gap.

He finished the race in the large chasing group that came home 12 seconds down on Van Avermaet, and ends his career level with Roger De Vlaeminck on four Paris-Roubaix victories.

A lone chase attempt by world champion Peter Sagan Bora-Hansgrohe was interrupted by a puncture, and the septet out front quickly opened a lead of 30 seconds over the Boonen group behind.

Not even Stybar's repeated refusal to contribute could stall their progress. When Stybar attacked his companions four kilometres from the velodrome, however, Van Avermaet's ire was obvious as he shut down the move and then forced the Quick-Step man to close down Langeveld's subsequent attack.

Perhaps unbeknownst to the three leaders, they had begun to fritter away their healthy lead over a chasing Moscon and Stuyven amid the ensuing game of cat and mouse.

Van Avermaet led into the velodrome, and when Stybar almost brought them to a halt as he soft-pedalled to the top of the banking, Moscon and Stuyven were suddenly upon them.

Moscon had the gumption to attack immediately, and were it not for his obvious fatigue, his might have been a winning gap.

Instead Stybar swooped down the banking in pursuit and then launched his sprint, but Stybar's effort served only to lead out Van Avermaet, who claimed a decisive win, punching the air in relief as much as in joy as he crossed the line.

I'm really happy to have finally won a Monument because I've had a long wait for this. Van Avermaet's average speed of The peloton was puffed along by a strong tailwind early on, but it was still a brutally difficult day of racing.

No early break gained any real purchase before the first cobbles at Troisvilles, and there was scarcely a lull in the entire kilometres. Van Avermaet's win was all the more notable given that he went down in a crash shortly before the Arenberg Forest, replaced his bike and then spent more than 20 kilometres chasing back on as Quick-Step turned the screws up ahead.

Not for the first time this spring, he seemed to have ample energy to spare. Before the cobbles, meanwhile, Luke Durbridge Orica-Scott went down, though the Australian managed to bridge back up.

At that point, Katusha-Alpecin were controlling affairs in the peloton.

At that point, Katusha-Alpecin were controlling affairs in the peloton. Meanwhile, winner Nikki Terpstra Quick-Step Floors , already caught behind an earlier crash, hit the ground hard on the cobbles near Maing and abandoned soon afterwards.

The Olympic champion had to close a second gap to get back in the race. Van Avermaet found an ally of circumstance in puncture victim Alexander Kristoff Katusha-Alpecin on the other side of the forest and they eventually bridged back up.

Ahead of sector 18, Sylvain Chavanel Direct Energie attacked and enjoyed a brief rally off the front, but the first significant move came after sector 17 at Hornaing.

With 75 kilometres remaining, Sagan ripped off the front with his teammate Maciej Bodnar, as well as Oss and Stuyven, opening up a gap of 30 seconds over the bunch.

It was an ambitious attack from Sagan, but a puncture forced him and Bodnar out of the move, leaving Stuyven and Oss out in front. With 60 kilometres to go, Oss and Stuyven had 30 seconds in hand on a man group that included Boonen, Sagan and just about every real contender bar puncture victim Oliver Naesan.

With 40 kilometres to go, 15 men remained in front: On sector 9, Van Avermaet's teammate Oss went up the road once again, and the Italian would prove a most useful foil in the finale.

The flurry of attacks approaching Templeuve, triggered by Langeveld and Roelandts, helped to give shape to the winning move, as Van Avermaet, Stybar, Moscon and Stuyven came across.

Sagan looked to follow, but suffered a most inopportune rear wheel puncture, and his challenge faded. Boonen, for his part, was caught on the wrong side of the split, and his dream of a valedictory win disappeared up the road, even if he raged against the dying of the light all the way to the gates of famous old velodrome.

It was instead left to Stybar to carry Quick-Step Floors' hopes, but despite his persistence in using Boonen as a pretext not to work, the day — and the spring — belonged to Van Avermaet.

Zdenek Stybar finished Paris-Roubaix as runner-up for the second time in his career. Sebastian Langeveld rounded out the Paris-Roubaix podium in third.

Gianni Moscon delivered an impressive top five finish in his second Paris-Roubaix appearance. Zdenek Stybar looks back at Greg Van Avermaet just before the finishing sprint in the Roubaix velodrome.

Fans were out in full force for Tom Boonen at his final Paris-Roubaix. Greg Van Avermaet takes the Paris-Roubaix victory.

Greg Van Avermaet celebrates his Paris-Roubaix win. Daniel Oss on the move to take the pressure off Greg Van Avermaet. Peter Sagan rode an aggressive Paris-Roubaix.

Tom Boonen rolls across the Paris-Roubaix finish line for the final time. Tom Boonen closing out his last Paris-Roubaix appearance.

Greg Van Avermaet made his way back from an early puncture to rejoin the main group midway through Paris-Roubaix.

This was as a result of Johan Museeuw 's crash in as World Cup leader, which resulted in gangrene so severe that amputation of his leg was considered.

It's the true definition of hell. It's very dangerous, especially in the first kilometre when we enter it at more than 60kh.

The bike goes in all directions. It will be a real spectacle but I don't know if it's really necessary to impose it on us.

What I went through, only I will ever know. My knee cap completely turned to the right, a ball of blood forming on my leg and the bone that broke, without being able to move my body.

And the pain, a pain that I wouldn't wish on anyone. Breaking a femur is always serious in itself but an open break in an athlete of high level going flat out, that tears the muscles.

At beats [a minute of the heart], there was a colossal amount of blood being pumped, which meant my leg was full of blood.

I'm just grateful that the artery was untouched. So many fans have taken away cobbles as souvenirs that the Amis de Paris—Roubaix have had to replace them.

It was first used in and, as of , has been used every year since except The final stretch of cobbles before the stadium is named after a local rider, Charles Crupelandt , who won in and The organiser of the Tour de France, Henri Desgrange, predicted he would win his race.

Crupelandt then went to war and returned a hero, with the Croix de Guerre. This m sector was created for the centenary event in by laying a strip of smooth new cobbles down the centre of a wide street.

The finish until was on the original track at Croix, where the Parc clinic now stands. There were then various finish points: The race moved to the current stadium in , and there it has stayed with the exceptions of , and when the finish was in the avenue des Nations-Unies, outside the offices of La Redoute , the mail-order company which sponsored the race.

The shower room inside the velodrome is distinctive for the open, three-sided, low-walled concrete stalls, each with a brass plaque to commemorate a winner.

Paris—Roubaix presents a technical challenge to riders, team personnel, and equipment. Special frames and wheels are often used.

In the past, developments to cope with the demands of Paris—Roubaix have included the use of wider tires, cantilever brakes, and dual brake levers.

More recently, manufacturers such as Specialized have developed new types of bike which are designed to cope with the demands on the cobbled classics: Many teams disperse personnel along the course with spare wheels, equipment and bicycles to help in locations not accessible to the team car.

Riders have experimented, however. After the Second World War many tried wooden rims of the sort used at the start of cycle racing.

Francesco Moser wrapped his handlebars with strips of foam in the s. Gilbert Duclos-Lassalle and Greg LeMond experimented with suspension in their front forks in the s.

Some top riders receive special frames to give more stability and comfort. Different materials make the ride more comfortable.

Tom Boonen , using a Time frame with longer wheelbase for the first time, won the race in and has since continued to use a bike with a longer wheelbase.

The manufacturers claimed this took nearly all the shock out of the cobbles. Hincapie's Trek bicycle fared less well in Canadian rider Steve Bauer had a frame built by Eddy Merckx Bicycles with extremely slack angles, to the extent of being semi-recumbent.

It was not a success and was only used for one edition of the race. The bicycle made for Peter Van Petegem in was a Time. The bad roads cause frequent punctures.

A service fleet consisting of four motorcycles and four cars provides spares to riders regardless of team.

Every year we change fewer wheels, because the wheels and tyres are getting better and better. We changed about 20 wheels today.

Tyres are becoming much better than before. Every year, there's new types of gears, new aluminium frames, new titanium frames, so it's getting more complex for us to offer neutral service.

We have a list in the car of who is riding Mavic or Shimano or Campagnolo ; the moment someone gets a flat tyre we need to think of a lot of things at once.

Is it a titanium frame or a carbon frame or a steel frame? In , Georges Passerieu broke away from a small leading group just before Douai because he knew he couldn't outsprint them if they all finished together.

He was chased all the way to Roubaix by a Belgian, Cyrille van Hauwaert, and tension in the velodrome was high.

The crowd heard that Passerieu had reached the stadium but nobody rode on to the track. The leader was just about to ride in when a gendarme stepped into his path to check if his bicycle had the obligatory tax plate attached to it.

Passerieu had already had a hard day and a shouting match broke out before he was allowed to continue. His happiness was short-lived. Arbitrarily accused of having provoked a fall by Julien Vervaecke, with whom he had broken away, he was disqualified without any sort of hearing.

Vervaecke belonged to the all-powerful Alcyon team, run by the no less powerful Ludovic Feuillet A Belgian may not have won but there were seven Belgians in the first ten.

The result in took several months and two international conferences to sort out. There was a break. His brother Fausto gave him a push to get him away.

He wanted his brother to win. I waited a bit and then I attacked and I caught him and the break. Then I went off by myself.

I was going to win Paris—Roubaix. I looked around for where to go and I was directed round the outside wall of the track, to where the team cars had to park.

It wasn't like nowadays, when there's television and everything. Then it was more chaotic and the whole road was blocked.

People said I should have known the way into the track. But how do you know a thing like that at the end of Paris—Roubaix, when you've raced all day over roads like that?

A gendarme signalled the way to go and that's the way I went. It was a journalist on a motorbike who managed to get up to me. He was shouting 'Not that way!

And that's the way I went, except that it came out on the other side of the track from the proper entrance. The bunch came in and Serse won the sprint.

But then his brother told Serse to go to the judges to object. But that was below him. Coppi wanted his brother to have a big victory.

He was a great champion, Coppi, but to do what he did, to protest like that to get a victory for his brother, that wasn't dignified for a champion.

That was below him. A champion like that should never have stooped that low. I never spoke to him about it. The only other times he rode it were in , when he finished fourth, and in , as the defending champion.

When he was criticised, he said: The incident made Hinault angry and he raced back to the others and won in Roubaix.

He was not the first star to refuse. The following year only Zabel was there. In he had stayed at home as well.

The fact isn't new but the phenomenon is getting worse and is concerning. The peloton of stayaways has grown to the point where Paris—Roubaix is now only for a tight group of specialists The race contained a rare spectacle where an early morning breakaway group held on until the finish: As if the success of the breakaway wasn't enough, Paris—Roubaix was about to deliver a cruel irony.

When the two entered Roubaix, Wegmüller ran over a plastic bag that flew out in front of him, which became jammed in his derailleur. Wegmüller was unable to change gears which was crucial for a sprint finish.

He got assistance from his team car to remove the bag, but his gears still would not change. Knowing that a bicycle change would be suicidal to his chances, Wegmüller continued on his damaged bike; Demol continued to draft behind him.

When it came down to the final sprint, Wegmüller could only watch as Demol sprinted past him to take the victory. Laurent Fignon finished third after a late breakaway from the chasing peloton.

I know the rules, yes, but I don't understand why nobody stopped us, and why nothing was said to us in the 10km that followed. All that just to be told two minutes before going to the podium that we had been disqualified.

Cancellara deserved his victory but for me, I will always be in second place even though I have been disqualified.

A doctor attempted to resuscitate him on the spot. He was flown to hospital in Lille by helicopter for treatment. Theo de Rooij , a Dutchman, had been in a promising position to win the race but had then crashed, losing his chance of winning.

You're riding in mud like this, you're slipping It is based in France but open to members all over the world.

It has its roots in the Paris—Roubaix Cyclo-Touriste of By there were 7, participants. There and at other events on the course, a petition calling for the cobbles to be saved gathered 10, signatures.

Its aim was to find enough stretches of cobbled road to preserve the nature of the race. So many roads had been resurfaced that, as the organiser said, there was a risk that it would become a fast race on smooth roads won by sprinters rather than those who had fought through hell.

Alain Bernard, who succeeded Vallaeys, says: Today, the association looks after the maintenance of these paths of legend, working with local administrations to preserve them.

But alongside that, we also do other things to preserve the value of the race, building up an impressive collection of documents, holding exhibitions, honouring former winners, holding tours of the route.

Not a day to venture outside Backs bent against the gusts, they tirelessly scratch at the ground with primitive tools. No, these are members of the "Amis de Paris Roubaix", trying to clean off the mud and crusted earth left on the cobbles by farm work.

They are on an important section of Paris—Roubaix and, without their intervention, the greatest of cycling classics, due to be held in only a few days, will not be able to come through And without these cobbled routes, the Paris—Roubaix would disappear, depriving the whole world of one of sport's most intense and gripping events.

This they know, and they'll be back again the two weekends before the race, far from the media and officials who will soon bustle here.

The passion that drives them is much stronger than the bad weather. It has nothing to do with the current storms in the cycling world.

Paris—Roubaix is sometimes compared to the other famous cobbled race, the Tour of Flanders in Belgium. Paris—Roubaix is flatter and has more difficult cobbles while the Tour of Flanders contains a series of hills, many on cobbles, like the Koppenberg or Kapelmuur.

In addition to Paris—Roubaix and the Tour of Flanders, called the cobbled classics , other spring races like Omloop Het Nieuwsblad and Gent—Wevelgem feature extensive cobbles.

There is a choice of three levels: All finishers receive a small cobblestone on a wooden plinth. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Urging, at times, even helping them victory. They ride in the tracks of bygone legends dreaming of distant fame and glory. But glory is not without a price.

These bloodied and battered warriors struggle through the rain, the cold, the mud, on roads better suited to oxen cart than bicycles.

But for the victor there is glory, immortality and a place in history amongst the giants of the road. Since , the greatest bike racers on earth have come to test their very souls in this brutal and beautiful spectacle".

This article maintains the misnomer 'Cobblestones' but attempts to clarify the misnomer where relevant.

Les Amis de Paris-Roubaix. Archived from the original on 12 October Archived from the original on 10 April Archived from the original on 14 March Astronomical Society of South Australia.

How to win cycling's hardest one-day races". Retrieved 27 March Archived from the original on 27 August Le Tour de France. Archived from the original on 19 June La Voix Des Sports.

Archived from the original PDF on Retrieved 22 April Daily life in the peloton". Archived from the original on 17 May Archived from the original on 29 September Retrieved 26 July Archived from the original on 14 June En Haute du Pave Les Amis de Paris Roubaix.

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